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are -- [applause] we are the most energy abundant country in the world. ten years ago or 12 years ago we were about ready to no longer have natural gas. it's amazing. people were building billion dollar plans to import liquefied natural gas into the country and today we have so much gas. that's because american ingenuity and american technology, a greek immigrant combining the two existing technologies, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling created the greatest explosion of innovation in the last decade of times certainly competing in the commercialization of the internet. there should be dancing and parade celebrating this incredible thing that we are now on the press at this of being energy secure and all the benefits that have. but unfortunately i guess because much of this has taken place in west texas and north dakota it's not cool. the people i don't know who come there is a committee that decides what school and what is and, so there isn't the kind of celebration that there should be. there should be because this is something that opens up the door for tremendous benefits for our coun
about energy, for instance. a lot of young people are starting green energy and alternative energy companies. we believe that you can do it through technology. all these ways that are very powerful. they're just not seen. they're not seen by everyone else. i think that is part of the challenge that we face. people say we're apathetic and lazy because the activism is not in your face and not out there. >> host: i'm sure they're true but they're also the activism is lazy because wait so easy. you october go online and sign an online petition or tweet something and that it counted as activism. >> guest: i think that idea has been overplayed, that somehow people in this generation feel they press a button and tweet and they think they changed the world. i don't know anyone who felt this way. what is happening now is there's greater awareness and accessible towards involvement in social activity. and that's a good thing. there are more people who are having some level of access to that process than not, and the hope is that for some of those people, in the long term, that will develop i
a business that changes the way the world is thinking about thinking about energy friends since. a lot of young people who are starting green and alternative energy companies. we believe we can do through technology in all these ways that are very powerful. they are just not seen. rather they are not seen by everyone else so i think that's part of the challenge that we face. people say we are apathetic and lazy because the activism is not as in-your-face and out there. >> host: i'm sure that is true but there is also this conceived that it's so easy. you can go on line and sign an on line petition or you can tweet something in that counts is that it is in today. is that affair could treat? >> guest: i think that idea has actually been pretty overplayed that somehow people in this generation feel impressed by a tweet and they have changed the world. i don't know anyone who has felt that way. what is happening now is there's greater awareness and accessibility towards political involvement and the involvement in social activity and that is a good thing. you know there are more people who
in truth we all ought to identify serious problems and fix them. for example, in our energy policy, we've had some of the most amazing failures and losses of federal money that i can imagine beyond anything that's logical and absolutely should not have happened. most people have heard of the solyndra company. they had political connections to the white house and received $528 million in federal loans. and then went bankrupt; left uncle sam holding the bag. and then there was another company -- abound solar -- it declared bankruptcy after receiving $400 million in federal loan guarantees, failing to deliver on the promises that they made, somebody at the department of energy apparently was not checking very well, and maybe they were more interested in a press release, in a big announcement and going to some solar factory and saying how we're going to create jobs and grow the economy and pumping hundreds of millions of dollars in the programs that sink. and beacon power received $43 million in a federal loan before it shut down. fisker, an electric carmaker, is not making any cars now du
to more smoothly and effectively enter financing, energy, railway and other factors. we will pursue reform in the social factor so as to promote upward mobility. in some universities in china, the share of rule of students is quite low. we need to gradually raise that so as to give hard-working rural students hope. [speaking chinese] >> translator: we need to focus on key areas and ensure overall coordination. we want to pursue comprehensive reform, covering all factors. so as to make this clear to the goal of socialism with chinese characteristics. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: the fact that in pursuing reform we now have to navigate on china's water when we also to confront some protracted problems. this is because will have to shake up that interest. sometimes stirring vested interest may be more difficult than stirring the salt your but however deep the water may be, we will wade into the water. this is because we have no alternative. reform concerns the destiny of our country, and the future of our nation. in pursuing reform we need to have courage, wisdom, and
comment. mr. president, as the ranking member of the energy and natural resources committee, i know that bipartisan progress on energy is possible in this congress, and while it may take our committee some time to develop to consider and complete legislation within this area, we have great opportunity to take the first step forward today through the adoption of a number of energy-related amendments that i have offered. i filed three amendments that would help us seize on the historic opportunities within our reach, i hope the senate would agree to adjust the resolution before us to reflect their beneficial impact. the first amendment that i have introduced is cosponsored by the senator from missouri, mr. blunt. it would raise an estimated $3.1 billion, and we're raising this not through taxes but by facilitating new energy production on federal lands and waters that are currently not open to development. now, it's worth noting that the $3.1 billion estimate is probably far too low. almost certainly that number does not account for the substantial receipts that would result from a go
. economists recognize the distortion of energy markets that overlook the true cost of carbon pollution, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address to preserve our planet commanded to our care by god. i lay no claim to religious authority, but i must believe this -- something that harms others, something that disturbs god's creation, something that stands on lies and greed, protecting that must not be consistent with god's will. in his 2010 world day of peace message entitled "if you want to cultivate peace, protect creation," pope benedict xvi cal
to deal with the sustainability, the sustainable environment, carbon energy, the world as we know it, weather governed by city or nation states will mostly vanish. the crisis we face in water supply in the rising oceans, in the shift of population, and immigration go drightly back to the problem of ecology. we have watched nation states sit by while all every of those tipping points whether it's two degrees in the raising of the atmosphere, whether 350 part per million of carbon in the at fear, our bypassed and go up and it's already beyond two degrees than the temperature has gone up. it's already well past 350 we are up to 420 or so and climbing. states have made an awful lot of noise and done almost nothing. but here is some interesting an optimistic facts. cities use 75 to 80 percent of the world 'carr bonn energy and are responsible for 75 to 80% of the world 'carbon emissions. they happen in city. which means even if china and canada and the u.s. and france do nothing, cities can impact carbon emissions significantly by the work they done. and indeed, that's already happening.
raising taxes. when we adopt a strategy of caring about people, then we will legalize american energy production. then we will get gas $2 a gallon. then we will make sure that your sister has her second amendment rights to keep herself safe from an assailant. and we will make sure that we are innovating and growing our way into the new cures, because we have uniquely american lifeblood as her signature. and what that is, is doing right by the next generation. we all benefited by these medical and innovative technology breakthroughs. they were gifts to us to our generation. and i say to you now that it's our duty to pay it forward for the next generation. it's our duty to grow the scientific progress and innovation that we desperately need. it's our gift and our legacy to the next generation. we do it because we love. we do it because we care. this is who we are. this is our movement. the movement of love. the movement of care. we do this because we love each other. and because we love our nation. die bless you, and god bless the united states of america -- god bless you and god bless
-established departments, defense, nasa, department of energy, all their acquisition management. they are still on the high-risk list, so that's a tough issue to resolve. and it's all about implementation and having the property discipline in place. >> and just to provide some context. gao has issued over 13 of products looking at every aspect of the justice programs and operations and made over 1800 recommendations. a key looking across all those protestant impact of the departments efforts, trace back to the management of the department. is to put this in context. we have identified this as a crosscutting issue and all the management areas are important, i agree that acquisitions along with i.t. are the two areas that have the most direct effect under the departments ability to secure the border, secure air travel. i.t. is very, very similar to acquisition. dhs is focus, the report on the initiatives that they are pursuing, and sure they're following their existing policy, not just in acquisition and i.t. but across all the management functions. dhs has good policy in place. the key is really execution,
their energy whether donations are going to washington so you see an explosion of support for the campaign that sclc was not prepared to do with. the often did things by the seat of their pants and it worked out but they add as a major campaign to bring thousands of people to washington d.c. building the encampment on the national mall to house those people and run a small city all while trying to mourn the death of their friend and a leader. it becomes obvious how difficult this will be as the campaign moves forward. and a series of caravans' brings people across the country from the pacific northwest and southwest and the south to bring folks across the country to washington to descend on congress and did ministration to say you need to take property seriously. here is example number one probably the most famous caravan that brought people to d.c. a classic symbol of southern poverty of black-and-white sharecropping. one of the rallies that happens later but what is interesting is while this is the most important symbols of the pork people's campaign, it is misleading because it reinforc
by treating a business the way we are thinking that energy instance. that's part of the challenge people say we are at it again sleazy because the activism is not as in-your-face and out there. >> host: that's true but it also conceived the activism is sleazy because it is so easy you can go online and signed a petition or you can tweet something. is that fair critiqued. that is pretty overplayed the generation feel they press a button and they tweet and change the world i don't know anyone that has felt that way. there is a greater awareness and accessibility towards political involvement and involvement in social the activity and that's a good thing. the hope is for some of those people in the long term that will develop into more and that will develop into greater engagement says if you introduce a have it or you introduce an idea to someone when they are young or impressionable in their formative years that later on their textile $5 that's great. we have more young people being donors than ever before and hopefully that means in the future people will believe that it is a good thing to g
more on that. if we could talk about is the changing energy environment globally and especially in the united states, as the united states becomes more self-sufficient rather than independent, and how that impacts the relationship with our countries? >> yes, you know, i think that -- we have had some divergences. some of it comes down to messaging, as we were saying before. we have the same sorts of reservations and worries about exactly what is the u.s. policy and will the u.s. actually back up those policies as the other allies do. that extend beyond the middle east. the divergence has been the ascendancy of islamic groups. the united states have been relatively sanguine about that. many are worried about the intentions of groups like the muslim brotherhood. when it comes to iran, i think there is a concern amongst the allies we focus on what is exclusively on the nuclear issue, almost as if we are having an arms control negotiations. many of our allies see it in a much broader sense, causing trouble in the region. again, i don't think that the administration doesn't see those
are legislating -- and i can also tell him where not going to carry on with a proposal made by the previous energy secretary which was about 179 pounds on everybody's bill. we decided to scrap that. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> trento want to ask the primers about the situation in cyprus. can the prime minister update the house what is being done to protect the british nationals including our armed forces who have deposits in cyprus banks? >> the leader of the opposition raises and externally important issue, and a very sensitive and difficult time for the republic of cyprus. first of all on the issue of anyone who is in cyprus because they've been sent there by the british government in the armed forces, m.o.d., or the foreign office, we've guaranteed that they won't anyway lose out in terms of their earnings or their savings. that is the first thing to say. we've also sure that money will be available which is why a plane with the money was sent to cyprus last night. in terms of, in terms of british citizens in cyprus, assumed our many thousands, of course we cannot insure them against any loss
. but of course i have the energy saving lightbulbs. the energy saver lippold saves as much electricity -- saves as much carbon in a year is moving to a walkable neighborhood space in a week. so the whole gadget discussion, what can i buy this around discussion. where can i live and how can i live to contribute less than the answers the city. this is fundamentally the opposite of the american eight.us. from jefferson on. cities are the morals, health and freedom of man. if they pile up pile upon ourselves as they do in europe, we shall take to eating one another as they do there. i was jefferson. i continue to make sense back in the 1700s but we have the country to spread out in the biggest transportation was fertilizer. that's not the case now. so all three of these are longer discussion. but they are all national crises. it's only going to get tougher. a national health crisis which is bankrupt and if any prebuilt to clear a couple weeks ago, global warming is beginning to think systematically. now we're talking about mitigating it. thus we have the better off we are in the more we become an u
percent energy all the time that the record we had a budget and want to make sure we are well funded and that is a different kind i was getting tired of. i think i left at the right time and it's now incredibly well. >> host: why don't you tell everybody what it's like to be a lawyer in an actual murder case. >> guest: >> host: what advice. >> guest: what advice. >> host: like is it like law and order? >> guest: i have a hard time watching the television shows. it's very intense representing individual when you are based on liberty and that responsibility especially in a murder case is incredible. there was never a time i wasn't a bundle of nerves. i felt sick because i knew if i may animistic it could cost the client. this also incredibly fulfilling. when the jury comes back with a non-guilty vote it's the better sound for me to know i was able to free some one and i felt good about so it's not for everyone. i talked to my students about this all the time and those that are interested in crumble wall kill the one to the prosecutors and someone to the defense attorneys and i encourag
energy for the rest of the day. it was a great way to start my day. i think the court still enjoys the privilege of having the exercise class early in the morning. >> host: will you stay and signed some books for everyone? >> guest: not everyone there are too many people. but i will stay for as long as i can. okay? all right. it has been nice. thank you. [applause] spinet we're at the see pat conference in washington d.c. with the former lieutenant governor of new york to put out a book called beating obamacare and she is holding the health care law. >> all 2,572 pages. i read this so you don't have to and beating obamacare is a walk through of the next 18 months. it is not a political book but a guide to help you avoid the land mines of the consequences and body blows over the next 18 months. >> the first to take effect but those who get coverage from their job are being hit and told we are dropping your coverage or pushing new down to part-time status because the law says they have to offer coverage the one size fits all package which is twice as much as they currently offers of
and economic priorities like our schools and our roads and bridges and our clean energy and manufacturing industries. mr. president, this budget puts jobs first and our economy first and foremost, but it also builds on the work we've done over the last two years to tackle our deficit and debt responsibly. you know, in 2010, president obama established the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform commonly referred to as simpson-bowles. that bipartisan group came back with a report recommending approximately $4 trillion in deficit reduction over ten years from a balanced combination of spending cuts and new revenue. the report pointed out that this level of the deficit reduction is more than any effort in our nation's history. other bipartisan groups including domenici-rivlin and the senate's gang of six as well as economists across the spectrum agreed that $4 trillion over ten years was a reasonable and responsible goal. now, since that time, congress and the administration have worked together to reduce the deficit by $2.4 trillion, $1.8 trillion coming from spending cuts,
energy cost grants programs that go to subsidize electricity bills in two states -- alaska and hawaii. alaska and hawaii. $5 million -- $5.9 million for the usda's economic impact initiative grants. now, the economic impact initiative grants have become slush funds for local governments to do such things as rehab an exercise room, renovate a museum on the pacific island of palau, and buy kitchen equipment for city government offices. now i'd like to talk a bit about defense spending. and this is probably the most painful part of my comments. and i will explain why later on. defense spending includes over $6 billion, $6 billion in unrequested or unauthorized funding for programs for the department of defense. at a time when the department of defense is facing the impact of sequestration on top of the $487 billion in cuts directed by the president, we can't afford to spend a single taxpayer dollar on programs that are not a priority for the defense department and our national security. the following things are beginning to happen now that the department of defense is under sequestration
and the cost of doing business is energy. creating a low carbon economy is done by create jobs rather than -- was a major step forward for new nuclear. today with help of we are also announcing our intelligence to take two projects to the next stage of development will support the manufacture of mission vessels in britain with new takes incentive and the honorable members has urged do you passionately and in a nonpartisan way about the damage of doing the famous ceramic industry and persuaded me we will exempt from next year the industrial processes for the industry and others from the climate change. [cheering and applause] [laughter] >> for the we will this year sign contracts for the commissioning relief, the expectations of which is already increasing investment. i want britain to tap to new sources of local energy like shale gas. i'm introducing a tax -- including a shale gas field allowance to promote early investment. shale gas is part of the future and we'll make it happen. we can help companies grow and succeed by wilding infrastructure, backing the local, and supporting successfu
there are 19 roughly million saudis and eight to 9 million foreigners in the kingdom. because energy is subsidized and cheap, people waste it. and it has now become again a subject in the saudi press and discussed among saudis that what's going to happen if we continue to use more, and we're blessed to export come and its exports of oil to fund our lifestyle. now, it is possible that the government will find a way to tell people we're going to cut the subsidies, but in this post arab spring environment, they are inclined to take things some people. and the country is $500 billion in foreign reserves, so it's hardly broke, but there are saudis financial institutions who estimate that the government spending will exceed government revenues by 2014. goes after the arab spring when king abdullah came home from back surgery, he passed out $130 billion to the society on top of a $180 billion annual budget. so more money for students stipends, more money to the religious establishment, more money to everyone, and created a minimum-wage for the first time for saudis. obviously, not for forei
, that was a symbol they were the body of christ eating feeding their spiritual energy saying that's you lying on the at tar, that bread. he says, receive what you are, the body of christ. when had became a matter of the priests changing the very substance, it's an act almost of new creation, uncreates the dog, the host, or the wine, and you create under a mere rack -- miracleous -- that made my go a step further and say what gave the priest this tremendous power? i started looking at the assessment, and the od thing is in the time of jesus, there were no followers. no more priests among the followers of jesus. there were priests, of course, the jewish priests, and the original followers of jesus went to tell. , observed worship, and went to synagogue. when paul went back from traveling, met james, ahead of the church in jerusalem, he said, you're traveling, a good jew, go to the temple and be purr mid. he did. they had priests such that they were the jewish priests, but aside from that, the followers of jesus never offeredded sacrifice, which is what a priest does. paul mentions ministries li
around iran immediately; impede the access of the world to energy by causing incidents in the gulf which our navy can overcome, but our navy cannot prevent insurance companies from tripling, quadrupling the cost of acquiring energy. so there's an enormously negative impact on global economy immediately, particularly in asia for which neither the japanese, nor the chinese will be particularly grateful to us. but also push the europeans much more into the hands of the russians. and then every adjoining area next to iran is susceptible to local war which used to be called in the communist lexicon people's war. i once had a meeting with xiaoping in which he informed us that he's going to invade vietnam, and he wanted us to be sort of passively friendly expecting soviet reactions. he was asked what is the likely soviet reaction by the president of the united states. and he sort of breezily said, well, you know, they may do this, they may do that, they may send arms, that will take a long time because we're not going to be doing it for a long time, they may stage border incidents, we have add
? >> yeah. >> there's so much negative energy for opponents of the aca. one of the things we needed was talk up the benefits because not everybody knows it's a good thing. some people might think they should wait. we want people to sign up right away. and talking to community-based organizations, there are a lot of federal resources, but there will not be a perfect plan handed to you on a silver platter. don't wait. this is an opportunity for our community. you need to do what you can in your own community, seek out these resources, but don't wait until it comes to you. you need to go to it. >> and definitely from the perspective of the national minority -- [inaudible] we represent over 3,000 community-based organizations throughout the country, and one of the things that we're trying to do is pass along a lot of the information that's being put out by hhs because it's already been well articulated that the cbos have a traditional role in helping the people that they serve get access to these expanded programs, and we need to put the tools at their fingertips. so the council really sees itse
relying on energy from the cold. should be speak about that differently? >> it goes something like this. if by 2017 can achieve independence, why in the world would continued to be concerned about the energy that flows out of the gold? my answer is i didn't go to the polls in 1991 and stayed there for the next 20 years. that's not why i went. that's not what my children went. we went there because we thought the region of the world where we have not except for a few bilateral relationships invested much bandwidth, commitment and we went there in 91 because of the aggression of saddam hussein, but we stayed there because he came to the realization the future is tied to our future and not through this thing called oreo, but rather as a said earlier, the shared interest in a common future where people could build a better life and what types could be managed collaboratively. not by the united states uniquely, but the relationships we build on congress. when i hear in 2017 oil more you speak for us. that's great. i hope we achieve energy independence. from a military perspective and i can o
. that would fit inside this room. having energy about 25 times the bomb used in hiroshima or about 427 tons of tnt. the people were lucky. that asteroid exploded more than 60 miles from the city and still injured 1000. the last major impact before that was in 1908. that asteroid was about 500 times the explosive energy of hiroshima. it was only about a factor, not quite fit in this room but not much larger. i'd lik like to start a video to show you what the solar system really looks like. this is an anatomically accurate, depiction of all the known asteroids in our space. this is every single loan astrid. ones on the outside part of the, that is the asteroid belt. those are the ones that will not hit the earth, between mars and jupiter. the ones on the inside, those are the ones that could hit earth and those are the ones that dr. green talked about. those are the ones we're concerned with. there's about 10,000 known near earth asteroids. however, we know that this is only a tiny fraction of those larger than the one that sharply of the windows are about 1 million. we do this by counting cr
had spent a lot of time and a lot of energy and everett making sure -- effort making sure that scott walker and ron johnson won that primary. but that was our decision. and i wouldn't have appreciated the national party coming in and telling the state of wisconsin, now, wait a minute, i don't know about scott walker, i think we're going to go with mark newman. well, that's ridiculous. and that's the point. it's not that we want to handcuff ourselves, it just isn't practical, and i don't think it's right. >> governors have gone on to become some of the most significant republican presidents in the last century, nixon, reagan, bush. is the party doing enough to support the rising star governors once they get past that state endorsement process? >> well, i mean, that's the plan for 2013 and 2014. um, i know that state parties sure do a lot of work and, obviously, the rga does. you know, we have a different party too. i mean, you know, i don't know, 15, 20 years ago maybe more there budget an nrcc, there wasn't 10, 20 different super pacs and 527s. we have a big group of organizations th
in which we parent which take this ominous amount of energy that could be spent on other, more intellectual pursuits. so what do you think is the new feminine mystique? problems that don't have a name? >> so funny that is coming from a french woman and have a giant best seller. anyway. i don't think this is the most important problem but i do think it is a misconception to some extent that the port of vacation of the culture means we are sexually liberated. it is a myth. not the most important thing but it is a myth. i think -- i did a book about this interviewing young women about why are you flashing for girls gone wild? why are you, before you have ever -- when you still experience sexual desire why do you think is your responsibility to look as gangly as possible as one woman said. there is confusion about the difference between -- it is confusing, the difference between filling a new role, antithesis of the angel in the house and being totally sexually liberated and it is confusing and another issue that was always confusing when you talk about what caused -- sex and corn was pretty fr
. the reporters at the time told me we were going come out. that is that the journalism a high energy, low paying profession. it meant there back point you look a little ahead and your kids are about ready to go to college and you better get some money. that's what i expected in the last chapter when we added up the one by one by one we find something totally the opposite. rather than getting out, they stay in. two-thirds of them are in their for thirty years, fort years, even fifty years. you say how can it be? well, there were two reasons. the main reason that was the world had changed for them and everybody else as well. during this period, spouses, in this case, mostly women, remember was 80/20. that's who you marry. somebody like you. so now their spouse was a psychiatrist or a lawyer or a high government official or a lobbiest, now you have two upper middle class salaries or income, and together you can send your kids to college. the second thing you find out runs right through this, the people love what we're doing. they loved it. and the people are love the things they do after they leave
with slow car been energy because already we have warned the world to a stage of climate shocks that we were headed for the 4 degrees world than it describes that it is catastrophic. the worst in porous parts affects everybody like the titanic. not just the people in steerage who survives. and that it is confusing people that we have forgotten about the people. but let me finish. i don't want to speak for too long. hopefully we have a question and answer but how i captured intergenerational justice. our first grandchild was born he is the older child of the daughter who helped me right. when the number one was born i had a physical reaction. somehow i read calibrated physically and i now think this is part of his life now joined by three other grandchildren. fable be in there '40's 2050 that is of key year with climate. they will share the world with 9 billion others. we now have 7 billion so the fastest growth of population ever known. a world where we will definitely have severe weather shock's, big problems of food security and what will they say about us? what would they say about the de
die because the electronics would be saturated by the energy released from the nuclear explosion. a high altitude explosion could have catastrophic effect on many satellites we rely on for weather, early warning, gps and other functions. >> dr. lu, what would that do to the astronauts on the space station? >> clearly wouldn't be good. i had the experience of being told to take shelter on board the international space station because of a large solar flare. that lasted in 2003 and happened a few times since. these levels of radiation could be much higher. >> senator cruz? staff? mr. dalbello, your company has over 50 satellites in orbit? >> right. 50 that we own. and we fly 70 some because we also fly satellites for other operators. >> how do you build the risk of these satellites into your business model. >> well, we have always planning for a fleet of that size you're always doing several things. first of all you're always building new satellites. you're always planning the launch of those satellites. this is well beyond the topic of discussion today, but launch is still a probl
will be the federal efforts. >> can i just add something? there is so much negative energy for opponents of the aca. one of the things we need is to talk about benefits we are talking to your neighbors because not everybody knows it's a good thing and some people think they should wait. we want people to sign up right away and talking to community-based organizations there are a lot of federal organizations but there will not be a perfect plan handed to you on a silver platter. this is an opportunity for community. he needs to do what you can in her own community and seek out the resources but don't wait until it comes to you. you need to go do it. >> we represent over 3000 community-based organizations and one of the things we are trying to do is pass a law putting out a to hhs. it started than well articulated that the cbs have additional role in helping the people that they serve get access to these expanded programs but we need to put the tools at their fingertips. so the council sees its playing a transitional role and putting it in at the fingertips of the people of the at the local level but
energy. those are the kind of things that we can do that don't cost money that create jobs, complete the keystone pipeline. don't keep sending money to venezuela, saudi arabia. create jobs in america. ask the people in north dakota. they have got growth and prosperity as a result of energy production. these are the kind of things that we can do and we believe in and we'll continue to work for. and i just say that maybe even though we have a big difference -- and this budget will be quite different from the house budget -- i don't say it's impossible that in conference that some sort of a more global agreement could be reached to put america on a sound path. we'll have to deal with the entitlements. entitlements represent half of the spending, and with interest, more than half of the spending that we spend, medicare, social security. those are growing well above the inflation rate, and they just need their growth level needs to be contained a little bit. and we can make them sound and people can retire and know that medicare will be there for them, it won't fail, that social security
security, energy management and once you save and electricity and have video, a baby monitors, a security, health care monitors, we work with health care providers growing diabetes and should we help you check -- check-in on demand with smart devices? it is an exciting time was all businesses. >> if you're watching cable in your house and something isn't working, you want to call the cable company. >> that never happens. [laughter] >> you have trouble getting through? >> i don't know what you're asking. [laughter] one of the main goals, we have the superb start this data head when people moved to nbc universal after 12 years of running comcast two or 3 million customers up at 20 they huge job and if you wanted to make it work better and although we're know whether near the definition of good service being able to use self-help bank get right the first time, i think we've made terrific strides as a more reliable network. >> may be having the reputation for not the best service? >> it is inherently an unpopular but if you like kidder night we collect the bill. and every single content compa
that invest in energy security, and that's subject to sequestration because it's an appropriation bill, but we have provisions in the tax code that gives special breaks to the oil and gas industry. these are expenditures. these are revenues that we're hemorrhaging. they should be at least under the same scrutiny as the appropriation bills. and what the budget is saying is that we can get some savings from these tax expenditures, and which we use that for is to get our debt under control. and senator murray, you're absolutely right. one of the huge differences between the democrats and republicans is that the republicans want to reduce the tax breaks for middle-class families to give bigger tax breaks for high-income families. we say we can make the tax code more efficient and have a budget that allows for the growth of the middle class and to manage our debt in a more -- better way. bottom line, this budget produces $4.25 trillion over the ten-year window compared to simpson-bowles which was $4 trillion. it's even more deficit reduction than the simpson-bowles proposal. it puts us on a sustain
a struggle. i have to acknowledged that josh 's energy, his brilliance and his commitment made this project. i wavered. josh would say, get up brother and he was the key author and the principle author. he laid down the tracks. i would come in and throw in some drums and throw in a little of this in a little of that. he pushed it around and after a while we set hey this is a book. so i really want to give kudos to josh who was the principle author and i'm the co-author. a lot of it was these conversations that we had over the years in person, on the phone, ours were reworked their ideas and where we talked about how this particular history might be written. i also want to give -- to chairman seale and i look forward to what he has to say. needless to say as a genuine american hero and thinking about how we treat people who have given their lives to better not only america but the world, he is one of those people we need to honor. also i want to thank all of the party members and fellow travelers and sensitive and empathetic folk who are here and to just decided i wanted to be here. what i w
's so much negative energy for opponents of the aca. when it's attack of the benefits. not everybody knows it's a good thing. we want people to sign up right away. talking to community-based organizations is one of federal resources, but they will not be a perfect plane handed to you on a silver platter. don't wait. you need to do what you can come to seek out resources, but don't wait until it comes to you. you need to go do it. [inaudible] >> one of the things were trying to do is pass a lot of the information being put up hhs but at the fingertips because it's been well articulated that the cbo has a traditional role in helping people they serve good access to expanded programs and we need to put tools at their fingertips. the council sees itself in a transitional role for the federal government and people at the local level. in addition to that, the court may every year they bring in about 2500 to 3000 health care providers and the rest of the meeting that will occur less than 30 days to present programs begin enrollment to get all the folks in the aca. so you could leave new orl
, heart and energy infrastructure will require involvement from federal, state and local government in addition to the private sector across the region. in recognition, president obama created a task force to ensure there was cabinet level governmentwide and reach of reach of my coordination to help communities making decisions about long-term rebuilding. the task force is a short-term entity. the executive order calls to produce a comprehensive rebuilding strategy for august 2nd. falling to leash in the test scores for wine done an implementation will be carried out by the relevant regional support functions already in place. one goal in strategies to identify and share best practices by other communities and help communities apply lessons to your rebuilding after his. an announcement we made but weak gad disaster funding to business owners can smirk quickly. the release of omar programs on base practices from other areas and local governments can modify and adapt to launch there on programs and small businesses and a citizens housing count going or where appropriate buyouts. givin
program or there are abuses in other programs out there, that we are wasting money on energy loans by the billions, solyndras and a-123's and those kinds of companies, they're saying all of that, but we can't save any money. there's no money to be saved. you just send us more money. and then we will pass it around, and this will stimulate the economy. so i'll conclude, i see we've got some colleagues that are here. i'll just say this: the debt that we have today, i have become absolutely convinced is too high. the gross debt of the united states is 104% of our economy. it's above our g.d.p., which is almost $17 trillion -- that debt is almost $17 trillion now. what we've seen from the rogoff and reinhart study and from recent reports by the international monetary fund, report by the european central bank, report by the bank for international settlements, all say when debt is as high as we are today in the united states, that begins to pull down growth. so my colleagues claim that they have a budget, they have a budget that will help create jobs. i would say, with all respect, we ha
to acknowledge that josh's energy, his brilliance and his commitment made this project. i wavered. josh would say, get up, brother. [laughter] and he was the key author, he was the principal author. and he laid down the tracks, i'd come in and throw in some drums, throw in, you know, a lit old of this -- a little of this, a little of that, we pushed it around. and after a while we said, hey, this is a book. so i really want to give kudos to josh who is the principal author and i am, indeed, a co-author. but a lot of it was these conversations that we had over the years in person, on the phone, hours where we worked through ideas, where we talked about how this particular history might be written. i also want to pay how many imagine to chairman seale -- homage to chairman seale here. i look forward to what he has to say. needless to say, as a genuine more than hero and thinking about how we treat people who have given their lives to better not only america, but the world, you know with, he's one of those people we need to honor. also i want to thank all the party members and fellow travelers and s
applaud her foresight for including investments in early childhood education, clean energy, national security, our veterans, and our seniors. and it preserves access to health care, opportunities for higher education and programs like snap and w.i.c. these supports are vital to keeping our economy moving in the right direction. her plan will help improve american competitiveness, foster innovation and open up more opportunities for small businesses to succeed. it lays out a blueprint for responsibly paying for these investments and reducing our deficit in a balanced way. each and every one of these priorities helps to improve the economic security of men, women and children, our families and our country. so i hope my colleagues will join me in supporting a plan, the murray plan that provides the foundation for growth instead of a plan that takes a meat ax approach to economic security of millions of families in our country. i yield the floor. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senator from hawaii for joining a number of very strong democratic women to talk about the importance of our b
department of energy by $50 million. the presiding officer: would the senator like to call up his amendment? mr. merkley: i call up amendment number 398. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from oregon, mr. merkley, proposes an amendment numbered 398. the presiding officer: two minutes of debate, equally divided. mr. merkley: mr. president, mr. president, --. the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. merkley: this increases the advanced research projects of the department of energy by $50 million. this is essentially what we know of as arpae. this is the most basic research to create breakthroughs in areas that range from renewable energy to energy conservation to so on and so forth, energy is the lifeblood of our economy, it's the lifeblood of putting ourselves into position to be one of the nations that sells technology to the world rather than buying it from the world. this is a huge leverage issue and i encourage my colleagues to support it. mr. sessions: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: i request th
. blunt: that's fine. mr. president, this amendment would protect consumers from energy price spikes and workers from significant job loss by providing a point of order against a carbon tax or a fee on carbon emissions. energy intensive jobs are the first to go when your utility prices get uncompetitive. your ability to compete in the world marketplace, the price of american made goods, what families pay at the pump, what they pay for heating and cooli cooling, what they pay for every american product they make would be impacted by a carbon tax or fee. and i urge the support of this amendment. mrs. murray: mr. president if. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i yield one minute to the senator from rhode island. the presiding officer: the senator from rhode island. mr. whitehouse: mr. president, except for perhaps in congress and in the boardrooms of exxonmobil, it is no longer credible to deny what carbon pollution -- the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. mr. whitehouse: -- it is no longer credible to ignore what carbon pollution is doing
, cosponsored by senator collins and senator merkley, would add resources to the energy program for the purpose of increasing support for the weatherization assistance program. it would also include weatherization in the investments urn the deficit-neutral reserve fund on clean energy and environmental protection. weatherization does several things. puts people to work, helps low-income people control their energy bills and helps us move towards energy independence. we have to do more of this, not less. this will put us back on the track of doing more and i would urge passage. mr. sessions: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: i thank the senator and his cosponsors for their work on this amendment. the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mr. sessions: i would note that it would double the budget numbers for the weatherization program and note that the recovery act a few years ago, the stic stimulus bill, provided $5 billion for the weatherization program. so while dubious about the wisdom of this doubling of the program, it is offset. and, th
to clean energy. let's clean up our act. let's save our children. save our grandparents. we're not talking about a remote possibility sometime in the near future. climate disruption is here. it's happening before our eyes. more american children are getting asthma and allergies. more seniors are suffering from heat strokes. let me tell you about what's happening in new york right now. we're seeing indications that extreme weather events like superstorm sandy are linked to health problems. do you know they've already given a name to a cough that has developed in that part of the country, locally known as the rockaway cough because it's in rockaway. the rockaways peninsula on long island, new york, was devastated by sandy. lives were lost. homes and businesses were destroyed. and now local residents are experiencing health problems from the flooding. coughing, it's a common symptom that health officials said could come from mold or the haze of dust and sand kicked up by the storm and demolition. if you listened to governor cuomo, what he said was these so-called 100-year storms are seen all
to produce very expensive fuel, shouldn't it at least happen through the the department of energy or some other environmental research-oriented institution? mr. inhofe: would the senator yield? mr. toomey: i would be happy to yield to the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: we went through this on the armed services committee. is the senator aware that in one purchase, the administration forced the navy to buy 450,000 gallons of fuel at $29 a gallon -- you could buy it on the open market for $3. and secondly, i think you do know this because i heard you mention the department of energy -- when we formed the department of energy, they're supposed to do all this. but i would have to make one observation. as we have a president, an administration who's been cutting dramatically, and we're all concerned about what's happening to our military, our ability to defend ourselves, they do it in three quais ways. number one, they cut, number two, they delay. and number three, this is what we're getting to now -- they take the agenda -- his green agenda and put it not where it should be but under the
the department of energy loans which i think could be more useful here at home to build bridges. so i urge adoption of this amendment which would allow a new creation of a bridges fund, which i think our country desperately needs. thank you. mrs. murray: mr. president, the senate budget resolution that is in front of us that we are thoapg get passed tonight providing strong investments in transportation infrastructure. it fully funds map-21, the recent highway bill. it provides $50 billion for urgent transportation needs and another $10 billion for an infrastructure bank. we could put more funding towards transportation projects and fund some good projects but not without making cuts to other vital programs. the amendment before us will make unnecessary and deep cuts to foreign aid and energy programs. i oppose this amendment and ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be a sufficient second. the clerk will call the roll. vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? if not,
. we've had reserve funds adopted for education, clean energy, infrastructure, farm payments, food stamps, health care, pensions, housing, tooth dekaeurbgs -- decay, and now homeowners. so these create 50 ways to pass taxes more easily. it turns the budget discipline, if we don't watch it, into mush and makes it difficult to do -- maintain the integrity of the budget act and avoids really in some ways the hard work of setting priorities. i think we should do this by voice vote, but i just want to call my colleagues' attention to the fact that reserve funds too readily used can undermine the integrity of the budget process. the presiding officer: any further debate? hearing none, all those in favor say aye. opposed, no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes do have it. the amendment is agreed to. mrs. murray: move to reconsider. the presiding officer: without objection. there are now two minutes equally divided prior to a vote in relation to amendment number 152 offered by the senator from ohio mr. portman. the senator from ohio. mr. portman: mr. president, this is an amendment that
is doing. nobody knows what somebody over here in the mickey leland energy fellowship funding is doing compared with the new area rural competitive technology grants program. here's the other thing we found as we have gone through all these programs is that we have people who apply for a grant, people who apply for a grant and get it from one of these programs, turn around and go over and apply for the same grant from another program. so it is easy to see when you can continue to see multiple programs. even to get efficient in our federal fleet we have five different programs, 20 different agencies just to try to put fuel efficiency in the federal government. we started out with electronic health records systems for veterans and military, we have ten different programs within that. not one program. not two. but ten. just one other. here's green buildings. we listed that. multitude of agencies, multitude of programs. every department in the federal government has a green building initiative separate and apart from a central area where it ought to be, probably associated with the nationa
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